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Seeking the Truth of Things

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Seeking the Truth of Things

Al Gini is a philosopher who writes for real people about things they actually care about: the meaning of work, moral courage, choice, sin, laughter, and leisure. In Seeking the Truth of Things, he explores his lifelong quest for wisdom.

ISBN: 978-0-87946-431-8

- Subtitle: confession of a (catholic) philosopher
- Product #: 1037
- Binding: paperback
- Page Count: 112
- Trim Size: 6" x 8"
- Pub. Date: September 15, 2010
- Publisher: ACTA Publications

Price: $14.95
 
Al Gini is a philosopher who writes for real people about things they actually care about: the meaning of work, moral courage, choice, sin, laughter, and leisure. In Seeking the Truth of Things, he explores his lifelong quest for wisdom. Part memoir, part introduction to key philosophical concepts, this book resoundingly establishes philosophy at the center and not the periphery of the public square.
 
Al Gini
 
Al Gini is a Professor of Business Ethics and Chair of the Department of Management in the School of Business Administration at Loyola University Chicago. He is also the cofounder and long time Associate Editor of Business Ethics Quarterly, the journal of the Society for Business Ethics. For over twenty-three years he has been the Resident Philosopher on National Public Radio’s Chicago affiliate, WBEZ-FM, and he regularly lectures to community and professional organizations on issues of business and ethics. His books include: My Job My Self: Work and the Creation of the Modern Individual (Routledge, 2000); The Importance of Being Lazy: In Praise of Play, Leisure and Vacations (Routledge, 2003); Why It’s Hard to Be Good (Routledge, 2006); and, most recently, he helped to edit and wrote the prologues for The Seven Deadly Sins Sampler (The Great Books Foundation, 2007) and Even Deadlier: A Sequel (The Great Books Foundation, 2009).


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Click here to download a copy of the discussion guide to Seeking the Truth of Things.
Group Discussion Questions for Seeking the Truth of Things by Al Gini
Chapter I: HOW I FELL IN LOVE WITH PHILOSOPHY
1.       Have you "fallen in love" with some form of knowledge? Share it with others and why it is important to you.
2.       What would your definition of philosophy be? Under that definition, are you a philosopher? Why or why not?
3.       What does "catholic philosophy" mean to you? Would it be spelled with a small "c" or a capital "C"? Why?
Chapter II: THE EXAMINED LIFE
1.       Is the unexamined life worth living? Explain your answer.
2.       What do you think William James meant by the "philosophical attitude of mind"? Describe someone who has such an attitude. What do you like/dislike about that person?
3.       Do you believe that Catholicism has something to offer the world regarding ethics and values? What is it?
Chapter III: THE NEED FOR MEANING
1.       What is your favorite "philosophical" book? Why?
2.       What do you think is the meaning of life? Does suffering and death negate that meaning? Explain your answer.
3.       Are Catholics happier than other people? Why or why not?
Chapter IV: TOO MANY CHANGES, TOO MANY CHOICES
1.       In general, do you like change and choice in your life? Give examples of each and why you like or dislike it.
2.       What is "true freedom" to you? How to you recognize it? What prevents you from exercising it?
3.       Is Catholicism conducive or obstructive to change and choice? Explain your answer.
Chapter V: THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS
1.       Which of the original seven deadly sins is your "favorite"? Why?
2.       Compare the two lists of new seven deadly sins on page 51. Which elements of each speak most to you? If you were going to substitute a new sin on each list, what would they be and why?
3.       Has Catholicism lost its sense of sin or just its sense of punishment? Give examples of your answer.
Chapter VI: A SHORT PRIMER ON MORAL COURAGE
1.       What is courage? Give examples from your own life or the lives of people you know personally.
2.       "The narcissist does not see past the needs and wants of self" (p. 58). What do you observe in our culture that leads you to think it is becoming more (or less) narcissistic?
3.       What in Catholicism offsets the human tendency to worry about self? Is this always a good thing? Explain.
Chapter VII: A PHILOSOPY OF WORK
1.       Name all the kinds of work you have done in your life (both paid and unpaid). What work was the most meaningful to you? Why?
2.       What do you think of Pope John Paul II’s assertion that work is "a fundamental right of all human beings" page 73)? What does this mean for people who are unemployed, retired, or homemakers?
3.       Does Catholic social teaching on work have something to offer our society today? What is it and how might you help to bring it about?
Chapter VIII: A PHILOSOPHY OF LAUGHTER AND LEISURE
1.       What is so funny?
2.       How do you re-create yourself? Do you spend enough time just "doing nothing"? Why or why not?
3.       Does Catholicism spend more time celebrating joy or comforting sorrow? Give examples of
each. What might you do to help balance the equation?
 
Copyright © by ACTA Publications. Copies can be made at no charge for groups discussing the book Seeking the Truth of Things: confessions of a (catholic) philosopher by Al Gini. The book is available both as a paperback and an ebook from booksellers or at www.actapublications.com.